LITTLE FREE LIBRARY

The Little Free Library (charter #45241) at Lynn Meadows Discovery Center is located outside on the grounds of the Kids Street exhibit and invites visitors to:

Take a Book.

Return a Book.

Visitors can select a book from the shelves of the Little Free Library to go home with them…we only ask that they bring a book in at a later date to add to the Little Free Library.

The Little Free Library is one way we can share the joy of reading with our young learners.

The Little Free Library was a service project and labor of love taken on by the Shedden/Brockman family and Heather Stiliana, who are part of the WINGS Performing Arts group. All books included in the Little Free Library have been donated through past book drives coordinated by Stiliano and WINGS members.

TIPS FOR READING WITH CHILDREN

Talk to your infant and toddler to help him learn to speak and understand the meaning of words. Point to objects that are near and describe them as you play and do daily activities together. Having a large vocabulary gives a child a great start when he enters school.

Read to your baby every day starting at six months of age. Reading and playing with books is a wonderful way to spend special time with her. Hearing words over and over helps her become familiar with them. Reading to your baby is one of the best ways to help her learn.

Use sounds, songs, gestures and words that rhyme to help your baby learn about language and its many uses. Babies need to hear language from a human being. Television is just noise to a baby.

Point out the printed words in your home and other places you take your child such as the grocery store. Spend as much time listening to your child as you do talking to him.

Take children’s books and writing materials with you whenever you leave home. This gives your child fun activities to entertain and occupy him while traveling and going to the doctor’s office or other appointments.

Create a quiet, special place in your home for your child to read, write and draw. Keep books and other reading materials where your child can easily reach them.

Help your child see that reading is important. Set a good example for your child by reading books, newspapers and magazines.

Limit the amount and type of television you and your child watch. Better yet, turn off the television and spend more time cuddling and reading books with your child. The time and attention you give your child has many benefits beyond helping him be ready for success in school.